What do we do?

 

Tourette Scotland is a registered charity (Scottish Charity No. SCO21851), who aim to:

  • Provide information, advice and support for children and adults with TS and everyone involved in their lives

  • Bring together individuals with TS and associated disorders, in order to share information

  • Produce newsletters, advice sheets and leaflets

  • Raise awareness amongst public and professionals in Scotland

  • Provide a telephone helpline for information

  • Arrange informal meetings biannually with guest speakers

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    About Us

    Tourette Scotland was formed in 1994. Formerly known as 'The Scottish Tourette Syndrome Support Group', it was started to fill a gap in support for TS sufferers in Scotland. Many people felt that it was impractical, not to mention expensive, to travel to London for meetings with fellow sufferers. So, six parents, of children with TS, got together, raised some money, and invited Consultant Mary Robertson to Glasgow. It was there that they had their first meeting.

    The three main office bearers at that time were Bob Brodie (Chairperson), Betty McGeachy (Secretary), and Joanne McKay (Treasurer). It is thanks to them that Tourette Scotland was born.

    Tourette Scotland is a national organisation that provides advice and support for children and adults with Tourette Syndrome (TS) in Scotland.  We work together with individuals with TS and their families, in order to support them, further their aims and ambitions, offer advice to assist them to manage and accept their TS, and lobby for raised awareness about the condition.

    For the past ten years, we have conducted research, devised training awareness sessions for professionals and practitioners, and worked with our users to explain to the wider community about the symptoms, traits, and experiences of those living with TS.  We have developed and utilised a series of sustainable strategies for those with TS.  Our track record is proven by our growing reputation as a leading authority on the condition, and the number of requests for support, outreach, training and research information are continuing to rise, as diagnosis is becoming more common.  Hits on our website are from many countries, although we work wholly in Scotland; we are asked to share our expertise and ideas with other organisations, and are continually developing new services and new approaches to dealing with Tourette Syndrome, and we recently presented at a European Conference in Norway.